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Admittedly, the realization that Mitt Romney might be a bit of a flip flopper is not exactly insightful. And it certainly is not as demoralizing as watching John McCain reverse himself on every principled stance that made him a maverick and still referring to himself  as …you know…a maverick. (Face it. Romney says whatever he needs to get elected and he has only successfully done that as Governor of Mass. He spent a fortune coming in last 4 years ago). Regardless, it is always entertaining to watch George Will’s tight, constipated face when he dismantles another GOP pretender to the throne:

A straddle is not a political philosophy; it is what you do when you do not have one. It is what Romney did when he said that using Troubled Assets Relief Program funds for the General Motors and Chrysler bailouts “was the wrong source for that funding.” Oh, so the source was the bailouts’ defect.

Last week in Ohio, Romney straddled the issue of the ballot initiative by which liberals and unions hope to repeal the law that Republican Gov. John Kasich got enacted to limit public employees’ collective bargaining rights. Kasich, like Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, is under siege. Romney was asked, at a Republican phone bank rallying support for Kasich’s measure, to oppose repeal of it and to endorse another measure exempting Ohioans from Obamacare’s insurance mandate (a cousin of Romneycare’s Massachusetts mandate). He refused.

His campaign called his refusal principled: “Citizens of states should be able to make decisions . . . on their own.” Got it? People cannot make “their own” decisions if Romney expresses an opinion. His flinch from leadership looks ludicrous after his endorsement three months ago of a right-to-work bill that the New Hampshire legislature was considering. So, the rule in New England expires across the Appalachian Mountains?

A day after refusing to oppose repeal of Kasich’s measure, Romney waffled about his straddle, saying he opposed repeal “110 percent.” He did not, however, endorse the anti-mandate measure, remaining semi-faithful to the trans-Appalachian codicil pertaining to principles, thereby seeming to lack the courage of his absence of convictions.

Romney, supposedly the Republican most electable next November, is a recidivist reviser of his principles who is not only becoming less electable; he might damage GOP chances of capturing the Senate. Republican successes down the ticket will depend on the energies of the Tea Party and other conservatives, who will be deflated by a nominee whose blurry profile in caution communicates only calculated trimming.

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One Comment

  1. Like Clinton and Obama, Romney is whatever he needs to be for his advantage at the time. I guess it’s his liberalness showing through. As a real conservative, I’m hoping some speculation that his latest flip flopping may have been the straw that broke the flip flopers back.


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